About Me

ME, MYSELF & I

Hey there! Let’s begin with the basics of me. My name is Caitlin Jones, and I have been growing up in a country town in Victoria, Australia for the past 20 years of my life. At the moment I am studying a Bachelor of Media and Communication majoring in Social Media; ironic, I know. And when I finish with that accomplishment, I am wanting to complete a PhD in the same field, as I am in love with learning in the media and communication area; again, ironic, I know. Oh and if you haven’t noticed already, I suffer from mental illnesses, in particular, anxiety and depression. You can read my blog posts to get the update on that!

Caitlin Jones

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 9,638 other subscribers

  • Home
  • /
  • Medication
  • /
  • 10 Things No One Tells You About Taking Anti-Depressants

10 Things No One Tells You About Taking Anti-Depressants

Spread the love
  • 1
  •  
  • 63
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Taking medication for mental illness, to some may sound over-dramatic, but to others, no big deal. However, there are certain aspects of taking anti-depressants that nobody will let you know of; here are 10 Things No One Tells You About Taking Anti Depressants.

1. IT IS JUST LIKE ANY OTHER MEDICATION

Mental health disorders are the same as other medical sicknesses. It is often believed that because illnesses such as anxiety and depression, are only built from emotional and mental foundations, that it is not as significant as physical illnesses. The development of mental health conditions can arise from too much or little hormones, therefore being a physically based illness; making it rational for medication to be used for treatment.

2. IT ISN’T AN INSTANTANEOUS REMEDY

Don’t expect the day after taking your first anti-depressant, that you will be the happiest for the first time in a while; also don’t suppose it will happen in the next couple of days either. It takes on average 6-8 weeks of having the medication, to see any improvement.

3. IT GETS WORSE BEFORE IT GETS BETTER

Within the first 6-8 weeks of taking the medication, your body is getting used to the medication; for me, I had these extra hormones, and they didn’t know what to do, and either did my brain. These can cause an individual to have their emotions over and above what they were, this can be hazardous and is often advised that one shouldn’t drive for the first two months.

4. THERE ARE A DECENT AMOUNT OF SIDE EFFECTS

The side effects that come from taking anti-depressants varies from person to person.

Here are the most common side effects, provided by WebMD.

  • Nausea
  • Increased appetite & weight gain
  • Loss of sexual desire & other sex-oriented problems
  • fatigue & drowsiness
  • Insomnia
  • Dry mouth
  • Blurred vision
  • Constipation
  • Dizziness
  • Agitation
  • Irritability
  • Anxiety

For me, I have had to deal with daily migraines and headaches that became an occurrence since starting anti-depressants, this lead to other medication taken on top. Along with that, strong fatigue came, and no matter how much sleep I receive, I find myself falling asleep anywhere, anytime.

5. IT ISN’T A HAPPY PILL

Sadly, it isn’t a pill made up of rainbows and unicorns; they help relieve not resolve.

6. OFTEN USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH OTHER TREATMENTS

The primary intention of taking anti-depressants is to be able to settle the circumstances surrounding the mental illness/es, and eventually transition to life without the use of them. With the combination of medication and therapy, the chances of being successful in healing are raised.

7. IT ISN’T ADDICTIVE

Only when used correctly. Of course with any medication, if abused by a user, they can become an addiction. That is why it is highly recommended that any thoughts of increasing anti-depressants should be discussed with a medical professional, instead of resorting to self-medicating. However, withdrawal systems may be present when being taken off of medication.

8. WORKS ON ALL SORTS OF MENTAL ILLNESSES

Just because it has the word ‘depressant’ in it doesn’t mean it only treats depression. Anti-depressants are a medication used towards treating other mental illnesses and mood disorders; depression, anxiety, bipolar, etc.

9. DIFFERENT MEDICATION WORKS DIFFERENTLY ON DIFFERENT PEOPLE

There are different types of anti-depressants, and there are different types of people. Just like cholesterol tablets, there are numerous ones available, so that there is one for everybody; people react to medication in various ways. Just because one type of anti-depressant worked for one person, doesn’t mean that it will work similarly for you.

10. IT IS A HIT OR MISS & TRY AGAIN CASE

It’s a matter of finding the best combination for you; this can be the weaving of many treatments (psychology, rehabilitation) and medications.

There are nine types of anti-depressants stated by NPS MedicineWise:

  • SSRIs: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors
  • SNRIs: serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors
  • Noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors
  • TCAs: tricyclic anti-depressants
  • RIMAs: reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A
  • Tetracyclic anti-depressants
  • Tetracyclic analogues of mianserin
  • MAOIs: monoamine oxidase inhibitors
  • Melatonergic anti-depressants

Meaning there are many options out there, so don’t give up after the first obstacle!

Share this post to create awareness over medication being used to treat mental illnesses!

All material is provided for informational use and should not be used as a replacement for medical advice or instruction. If you or someone you know needs help, consult a medical professional.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

UA-111639571-1